SHANG Liang
  • About
  • Biography
  • Exhibitions
    • Solo Exhibition
    • Group Exhibition
    • Art Fair
  • Artworks
    • Painting
    • Sculpture
  • Articles
  • SHANG Liang
  • Birthdate: 1981
    Birthplace: China | Beijing
    Gender: Female
    Lives and Works in: China | Beijing
    About:
    Shang Liang, born in Beijing in 1981, lives and works in Beijing and Shanghai. She graduated from the Oil Painting Department and the Experimental Art Department of the Central Academy of Fine Arts in 2004 and 2011. In recent years, notions of masculinity, heroism and the vocabulary that relates to them, such as power, strength and conquest, among others, have constituted major features in Shang’s works. Through repeated and textural brushstrokes she creates portraits, which unlike traditional ones, are based on specific characters as symbols revolving around these themes. Figures evolve through various series of paintings and sculptures, beginning with the "The Real Boy" series and followed by the series “Good Hunter”, “Sofa Man” and “Boxing Man”.

    Recent exhibitions include: “New Order”, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China, 2019; “Advent: Inventing Landscape, Producing the Earth”, Qianshao Contemporary Art Center, Shanghai, China, 2019; Porsche “Young Chinese Artist of the Year” nominatees’ exhibition, Beijing Exhibition Hall, Beijing, China, 2019; “Meeting the Future – International Exhibition for Contemporary Art”, S x V Museum of Modern Art, Qingdao, China, 2019; “Extreme Mix” Guangzhou Airport Biennale, Guangzhou, China, 2019; “YOHOOD 2018 global trend of Carnival”, Shanghai World Expo exhibition hall, Shanghai, China, 2018; “PLAY”, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China, 2018; “Form Consumption Over Substance”, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China, 2017; “Brewer J.C. Jacobsen's Portrait Award-the 2015 Portrait Now!”, The Museum of National History, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2015; “One Of Few”, Xin Beijing Gallery, Beijing, China, 2016.

  • Biography
  • Solo Exhibitions

     

    2019     

    New Order, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China

     

    2016     

    One Of Few, Xin Beijing Gallery, Beijing, China

     

    2015    

    Human Body User Guide, Asian Art Works, Beijing, China

     

     

    Group Exhibitions

     

    2019    

    Advent: Inventing Landscape, Producing the Earth, Qianshao Contemporary Art Center, Shanghai, China

    Meeting the Future – International Exhibition for Contemporary Art, S x V Museum Modern Art, Qingdao, China

    Young Chinese Artist of the Year nominates’ exhibition, Beijing Exhibition Hall, Beijing,  China

    Extreme Mix Guangzhou Airport Biennale, Guangzhou, China

     

    2018   

    PLAY, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China

    YOHOOD 2018 global trend of Carnival, Shanghai World Expo exhibition hall, Shanghai, China

     

    2017   

    Form Consumption Over Substance, MadeIn Gallery, Shanghai, China

     

    2016   

    The Liquid Wall, UCCA Store, Beijing, China

     

    2015   

    The Only In This Multifarious World” Ming Yuan Art Museum, Shanghai, China

    Brewer J.C. Jacobsen's Portrait Award-the 2015 Portrait Now! The Museum of National History, Copenhagen, Denmark

    TA age - art exhibition, Times Art Museum, Beijing, China

     

    2014     

    Portrait Now - Contemporary Urban Life, Times Art Museum, Beijing, China

     

    2013     

    Teachers’ work of CAFA, CAFA Art Museum, Beijing, China

    Her age - art exhibition, Times Art Museum, Beijing, China

     

    2012   

    Maker Carnival, 2012, CMoDA, Beijing, China

     

    2011   

    The Folded Plane Art Exhibition, Ming Yuan Art Museum, Shanghai, China

    Artificial Emotions—New Media Arts Exhibition, Song Zhuang Art Center, Beijing, China

     

    2010   

    The Scene • Continuous Tense, Screen age Art Dialogue Exhibition, CCD workstation, C5 Art, Beijing, China

     

    2009   

    Real- Life Fairy Tales, Beyond Art Space, Beijing, China

    Green Art fair, China World Trade Center, Beijing, China

    Blu-chip, Em Art Gallery, Beijing, China

     

    2008   

    Butterfly, The 2nd Documents Exhibition of Shanghai, MoCA, China

    Waiting In the Wings, Beyond Art Space, Beijing, China

     

  • Exhibitions
    • 2021 ART021 Contemporary Art Fair
      Nov 11, 2021 - Nov 14, 2021
      Opening: Nov 11, 2021 14:00 Thursday
      Artists: CAI Jian, CHEN Ying, LU Pingyuan, MO Shaolong, PU Yingwei, SHANG Liang, SONG Kun, SU Yu-Xin, WANG Ziquan, XU ZHEN®, YANG Yang
      • Art Fair
    • Beijing Contemporary 2021
      Oct 13, 2021 - Oct 17, 2021
      Opening: Oct 13, 2021 Wednesday
      Artists: CHEN Ying, DING Li, GE Hui, LU Pingyuan, MO Shaolong, SHANG Liang, SONG Kun, XU ZHEN®, ZHANG Ke
      • Art Fair
    • 2021 WWART
      Sep 24, 2021 - Oct 10, 2021
      Artists: CAI Jian, DING Li, LI Hanwei, SHANG Liang, Shanliang , XIA Yunfei, XU ZHEN®
      • Art Fair
    • 2021 DnA SHENZHEN
      Sep 30, 2021 - Oct 4, 2021
      Artists: CAI Jian, DING Li, GE Hui, HE An, LU Pingyuan, SHANG Liang, SONG Kun, WANG Ziquan, XU ZHEN®
      • Art Fair
    • MadeIn Gallery Participates in Art Xiamen 2021
      Jun 17, 2021 - Jun 20, 2021
      Artists: CHEN Ying, GE Hui, LU Pingyuan, SHANG Liang, SU Yu-Xin, XU ZHEN®, YANG Yang, ZHOU Zixi
      • Art Fair
    • Shang Liang: Mortal at the Helm
      Mar 20, 2021 - Apr 30, 2021
      Opening: Mar 20, 2021 16:00 Saturday
      Artist: SHANG Liang
      • Solo Exhibition
    • MadeIn Gallery participates in Frieze NY Viewing Room
      May 6, 2020 - May 16, 2020
      Opening: May 6, 2020 16:00 Wednesday
      Artists: CHEN Ying, DING Li, LIU Wa, LU Pingyuan, PU Yingwei, SHANG Liang, SU Yu-Xin, XU ZHEN®, YANG Yang
      • Art Fair
    • New Order
      Jul 13, 2019 - Sep 29, 2019
      Opening: Jul 13, 2019 16:00 Saturday
      Artist: SHANG Liang
      • Solo Exhibition
    • Art Busan 2019
      May 30, 2019 - Jun 2, 2019
      Artists: DING Li, LU Pingyuan, SHANG Liang, XU ZHEN®
      • Art Fair
    • Frieze New York
      May 3, 2019 - May 5, 2019
      Artists: DING Li, LU Pingyuan, SHANG Liang, XU ZHEN®, ZHENG Yuan
      • Art Fair
    More...
  • Artworks
    • Auto Man No.1

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 100 × 155 cm | 2020

    • Portrait of the Boxing Man No.6

      Sculpture | Fiberglass, paint | 215 × 81 × 75 cm | 2021

    • Portrait of the Boxing Man No.5

      Sculpture | Cast copper, gold foil | 60 × 26 × 35 cm | 2021

    • Sofa Man No.7

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 129 × 166 cm | 2020

    • Sofa Man No.6

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 116 × 155 cm | 2020

    • Boxing Man No.12

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 40 × 40 cm | 2019

    • Boxing Man No.14

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 166 × 129 cm | 2021

    • Boxing Man No.13

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 116 × 85 cm | 2020

    • Good Hunter No.15

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 110 × 200 cm | 2021

    • Good Hunter No.16

      Painting | Oil on canvas | 100 × 100 cm | 2021

  • Articles
    • Muscle Boys

      Original Author: Tomás Pinheiro

      When she first began painting, Shang Liang created carefully arranged, realistic depictions of everyday scenes in a mild color palette. Fifteen years later, her works have different air: one of abnormal power and force. She paints muscular characters that seem to burst out of the frame of her large canvases. They can be human or inhuman, but they all possess the same larger-than-life muscles. 

      Born in 1981 in Beijing, Shang was raised in a military community in the same city. She attended the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA), where she studied oil painting under Liu Xiaodong, one of China’s greatest painters. Several years later, searching for new means of expression, she returned to CAFA for a master’s degree in experimental art, and there she developed a distinctive, slightly surreal style.

      This distinctive style began to appear when she became interested in the subject of adolescence: “I think there is obscurity about this period in life,” she explains, “teenagers have confused emotions and uncertainty about what they will become. It’s a period of intense transformation and development, both in the body and the mind.” More than anything else, adolescence is an important moment for developing a moral sense. Teenagers are complicated beings, innocent and still quite vulnerable to the influences around them.

      

In 2012, Shang began to work on The Real Boy series, portraying slender teenage boys with hypertrophic abdominals, chests, and arms. Some are flexing their muscles so hard that veins pop out on their skin. Their faces still reveal tenderness and immaturity, but their expressions and body language suggest a longing to become powerful, muscle-bound men. 

      Some paintings in this series feature boys with long, pointy noses, a clear reference to Carlo Collodi’s classic children’s tale Pinocchio. Like the puppet who dreamed of becoming a real boy, the characters in these paintings have to prove themselves mature without straying from the path of honesty and morality. This series dramatizes the challenges and conflicting impulses of adolescence. 

      Shang’s following series, Good Hunter, developed naturally from The Real Boy: it’s as if the same characters had grown both in physical form and in confidence. The new characters seem to have exaggerated internal strength, with bodies developed into cartoonish muscular form. Their faces, however, retain the same boyish expressions or have no expression at all. The oversized canvases, bigger than a human body, suggest an intimidating superhuman strength. Standing before these characters, the viewer may feel small, or even oppressed. The exaggerated manliness combined with a complete absence of women seems to be an allusion to patriarchal systems built on oppression and misogyny.

      In Boxing Man, her latest series, Shang departs completely from realistic human anatomy, and a new character emerges: one with a boxing glove in the place of the head and no sexual organs.  None of her characters ever really have an adult face, and here they are frightening and inhuman creatures. As she explains: “It’s not human. It’s a new species. You can guess how it senses the world, what it feels, and what it thinks.” With the metaphor of strength and power becoming a head on their own, Boxing Man appears as the culmination of all underlying issues found in her previous series: the struggle for the ultimate strength, the torture of moral dilemmas, and the blind pursuit of power. 

      As references for her characters, Shang looks to bodybuilding and fighting TV shows. She also refers to classical sculptures by Michelangelo. To achieve a certain luminosity, she places different layers of paint one over the other. Red, dark-red, and brown are predominant colors, evoking oxygenated and deoxygenated blood and bruises. Her brushstrokes have a notable strength, which comes, no doubt, from her practice of Chinese calligraphy. There are also elements of taiji embedded in the movements and curves of the characters.

      Although she has unconsciously absorbed traditional Chinese elements, Shang’s underlying subject matter is not specific to any country or culture. Her work can be seen as a critical commentary on traditional ideas of masculinity. It is fascinating that this appraisal comes from a female artist. If boys face excruciating difficulties when expected to assume the role of a man, what do girls feel when they, too, are expected to succeed?

      Selected works from Good Hunter and Boxing Man are on display in a solo show at MadeIn Gallery until the first of September. 

       

      Address:

      MadeIn Gallery
      Longteng Avenue, lane 2879, no. 106
      Xuhui district, Shanghai
      www.madeingallery.com


      Website: shangliang.co

      Contributor: Tomás Pinheiro
      Chinese Translation: Olivia Li

       

      Article Link:

      http://neocha.com/magazine/muscle-boys/

    Muscle Boys

    By Tomás Pinheiro 2019-07-30

    Original Author: Tomás Pinheiro      Translation

    When she first began painting, Shang Liang created carefully arranged, realistic depictions of everyday scenes in a mild color palette. Fifteen years later, her works have different air: one of abnormal power and force. She paints muscular characters that seem to burst out of the frame of her large canvases. They can be human or inhuman, but they all possess the same larger-than-life muscles. 

    Born in 1981 in Beijing, Shang was raised in a military community in the same city. She attended the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA), where she studied oil painting under Liu Xiaodong, one of China’s greatest painters. Several years later, searching for new means of expression, she returned to CAFA for a master’s degree in experimental art, and there she developed a distinctive, slightly surreal style.

    This distinctive style began to appear when she became interested in the subject of adolescence: “I think there is obscurity about this period in life,” she explains, “teenagers have confused emotions and uncertainty about what they will become. It’s a period of intense transformation and development, both in the body and the mind.” More than anything else, adolescence is an important moment for developing a moral sense. Teenagers are complicated beings, innocent and still quite vulnerable to the influences around them.

    

In 2012, Shang began to work on The Real Boy series, portraying slender teenage boys with hypertrophic abdominals, chests, and arms. Some are flexing their muscles so hard that veins pop out on their skin. Their faces still reveal tenderness and immaturity, but their expressions and body language suggest a longing to become powerful, muscle-bound men. 

    Some paintings in this series feature boys with long, pointy noses, a clear reference to Carlo Collodi’s classic children’s tale Pinocchio. Like the puppet who dreamed of becoming a real boy, the characters in these paintings have to prove themselves mature without straying from the path of honesty and morality. This series dramatizes the challenges and conflicting impulses of adolescence. 

    Shang’s following series, Good Hunter, developed naturally from The Real Boy: it’s as if the same characters had grown both in physical form and in confidence. The new characters seem to have exaggerated internal strength, with bodies developed into cartoonish muscular form. Their faces, however, retain the same boyish expressions or have no expression at all. The oversized canvases, bigger than a human body, suggest an intimidating superhuman strength. Standing before these characters, the viewer may feel small, or even oppressed. The exaggerated manliness combined with a complete absence of women seems to be an allusion to patriarchal systems built on oppression and misogyny.

    In Boxing Man, her latest series, Shang departs completely from realistic human anatomy, and a new character emerges: one with a boxing glove in the place of the head and no sexual organs.  None of her characters ever really have an adult face, and here they are frightening and inhuman creatures. As she explains: “It’s not human. It’s a new species. You can guess how it senses the world, what it feels, and what it thinks.” With the metaphor of strength and power becoming a head on their own, Boxing Man appears as the culmination of all underlying issues found in her previous series: the struggle for the ultimate strength, the torture of moral dilemmas, and the blind pursuit of power. 

    As references for her characters, Shang looks to bodybuilding and fighting TV shows. She also refers to classical sculptures by Michelangelo. To achieve a certain luminosity, she places different layers of paint one over the other. Red, dark-red, and brown are predominant colors, evoking oxygenated and deoxygenated blood and bruises. Her brushstrokes have a notable strength, which comes, no doubt, from her practice of Chinese calligraphy. There are also elements of taiji embedded in the movements and curves of the characters.

    Although she has unconsciously absorbed traditional Chinese elements, Shang’s underlying subject matter is not specific to any country or culture. Her work can be seen as a critical commentary on traditional ideas of masculinity. It is fascinating that this appraisal comes from a female artist. If boys face excruciating difficulties when expected to assume the role of a man, what do girls feel when they, too, are expected to succeed?

    Selected works from Good Hunter and Boxing Man are on display in a solo show at MadeIn Gallery until the first of September. 

     

    Address:

    MadeIn Gallery
    Longteng Avenue, lane 2879, no. 106
    Xuhui district, Shanghai
    www.madeingallery.com


    Website: shangliang.co

    Contributor: Tomás Pinheiro
    Chinese Translation: Olivia Li

     

    Article Link:

    http://neocha.com/magazine/muscle-boys/











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